Google’s Lost Patent Could Be the Answer to Stopping Hackers

Google is a company with many a project, invention, patent, and product, and sometimes things get left behind and forgotten about, and that seems to be the case with what could be a very important breakthrough in the world of internet security. There’s been a lot of bad press lately about firms that haven’t quite protected their customers as they should have and failed to tell them about it too (not mentioning any names, Yahoo). Foreign hackers have even managed to get into some of the government’s systems too, so is anything really secure on the web? The answer is probably no, at the moment, but with the help of Google’s lost patent that could be about to change.


The lost patent that may just make hacking impossible is numbered US 7545929 B1 and is entitled “Analog encryption.” As far as the description of the patent goes it’s noted as “a method and apparatus for encrypting analog data while minimizing data loss.” Their product allows the user to encrypt the analog signal that’s on one device over to another device that will decrypt it without the need for any digital conversion. It allows two separate devices to communicate through an entirely analog broadcast but is scrambled data to anyone unless on the exact same setting. As there is no digital data, it’s effectively impossible for a computer to decrypt.

Another important feature and unique selling point of this patented device are that it allows the transfer of data between the two devices with very little distortion to the data. This basically means that high quality or sensitive documents or media would be safe and easy to transfer with a very minimal risk of being hacked. It may seem as though we’re moving backward by sticking with analog but at the end of the day it’s about keeping ourselves and our personal data safe. So, if analog is the best way to do it and keep our internet virtually hack-free, then so be it, come on Google, let’s go analog….again!.



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