Scientists Identify The Protein That Could Prevent Tumor Growth in Cervical Cancer

Scientists Identify The Protein That Could Prevent Tumor Growth in Cervical Cancer

Cervical cancer is an ongoing concern for women of a variety of ages. Those that have been exposed to the Human Papillomavirus are the most susceptible. Smoking and other environmental factors can also be a factor in the development of this cancer. The resulting inflammation of the virus results in irregular cells. A new treatment using Cystatin E/M is being used in research to combat cervical cancer. The cellular inflammation is what is thought to help cancer to survive. This inflammation is helped out by the protein NFkB. There is the need to inhibit this protein to keep the cancer cells from accomplishing their task.





Many new treatments are aimed at stopping cancer from its deadly progression. This approach is much more efficient that treating symptoms or using a toxin like chemotherapy that also wreaks havoc on the immune system by attacking systematically. The newest research is geared towards finding what makes cancer able to survive in the body and bypass the bodies defense systems. The weaknesses can then be found, and the cancer cells are attempted to be disabled.

Scientists Identify The Protein That Could Prevent Tumor Growth in Cervical Cancer
Courtesy of Molecular and Cellular Biology Cervical cancer cells. The disease is the second most common cause of cancer-related deaths in women.

The Human Papillomavirus is found to be related to 90% of the cervical cancer cases. While prevention of HPV is also a new approach to wiping out this cancer, treatment is also necessary. Many women with HPV are asymptomatic. They never show any symptoms of the virus. Therefore, they think they are not at a high risk for cervical cancer. Yearly pap smears can help to catch these complications early on, as well. The next step for cystatin E/M is to see if it can be effective in treating chemoresistant tumors in breast cancer cases.

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